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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
you, guys, these are the guys behind the scenes helping us to get on the air every single morning at 5:00 a.m. . matt. he's look at his picture. they are fantastic crew and thank you for making the show possible and thanks to you, merry christmas to you. have a good one. we appreciate you watching. see you soon. >> it is monday and christmas eve everyone. are you getting into the spirit. i am gretchen carlson, thanks for sharing your time today. a merry merry christmas. americans get ready to celebrate one thing remains certain congress is far apart to avoid a deal. >> will it be a white or wet christmas? >> weather causing concerns for travelers . causing shipping delays. why one major shipping company said the gift may not show up until after the holiday. >> i am one of those people . who is the most dreaded guest of all . new survey said one family most people don't want at the christmas table. let us know your thoughts. "fox and friends" begins right now. >> this is scotty knox, you are watching "fox and friends", happy holidays, what? i am the only one? >> that's how we talk aroun
and in the new year. and that is it for us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm in for bill o'reilly. please remember the is spin it stops right here because we are always looking out for you. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> sean: marry christmas and welcome to this hannity holiday special. in a few minutes we will take you to afghanistan for an exclusive look at how our troops stay connected to families back home during the holidays. and we will also hear a timeless message from president ronald reagan recorded 32 years ago but still just as meaningful tonight. first, pastor rick wa warren hs book the purpose driven life has been read by more than 60 million people worldwide and currently bel rereleased to celebrate its 10th anniversary. i sat down with pastor warren to talk about the meaning of christmas. what does christmas mean to rick warren? >> the very first christmas the angels said three things. those three things are the three purposes of christmas. celebration. salvation. reconciliation. here are the three things. the first thing the angel announced is is i bring
us. she really was an incredible woman and quite a figure. i mean, she really talked a lot about in very dcandid terms her own personal struggles. >> she was very powerful, and the reason she had so many followers especially among women in the mexican-american community and also in mexico because she was the kind of woman who would say u-you may think you're a big mexican macho, but i can have you eat from my hand in minutes. she spoke about empowering women and spoke about against domestic violence. those themes that resonated with the community, and if you watch an interview, a lot of times there had to be a lot of bleeping because she was not afraid to speak her mind exactly the way she felt about a thin. she was not afraid at all, and that's how she will be remembered, i think. >> i thought it was interesting, too. it was as recently as saturday i read she was talking about experiencing pain and she's like any other woman. she's not any different. tell us how she influenced the audience with her music. >> she married three times and had five children. she became a mom at age
vote early. >> your list of your photo i.d., utility bill, you can use all those things or you can when you are voting early, you write your name, address, date of birth, driver's license number, they will ask for it with your social security number or you can provide one of these 13 additional items in your signature a and a cross check that against the database, and that talks it works in our state. estimates are you voting early at your courthouse or are you voting early in the different areas. >> or the designated area members. >> in west virginia we have early voting in the courthouse and we also have what is called satellite. so, i am trying to figure out how you do that. how you cannot ask for -- >> because you are using the driver's license number or the last digits of the security number and checking that come and before that envelope is opened the check that against the statewide data base where is your signature excess of the electronic file and where all of that information access on the physical copy of it and then that is the same way if you vote by mail you are not we to
are the chances of them getting their ducks in a row, boehner getting his ducks in a row and us still being able to avoid the krif? >> right. we should have a better sense of that by tomorrow afternoon when they start to reconvene. speaker boehner made it clear at the meeting at the white house on friday, anything that the senate passes will be considered by the house, might be amended, might be changed a bit. has to go back to the senate quick for changes. but he said will indeed be considered. the question, can perhaps all the democrats plus at least some republicans, come together to pass something while a bunch of conservative republicans will oppose it, because it's raising taxes for one thing. >> the issue of taxes, is this a consequence of really what happens with bush 41? who is recovering in the hospital, by the way, right now and certainly our thoughts are with him. when he broke that pledge, read my lips, no new taxes, that was a real turning point for republic i had dans thought he lost that election because he went back on that pledge and raise taxes. will you get anyone in the hous
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
-called fiscal cliff. so a very big moment in the nation's capital. and to walk us through what might happen we turn to jessica yellin, a chief white house correspondent. jessica, we said up front, it is a long shot, give us a best case scenario. >> reporter: the best case scenario would be that all the leaders walk out of this meeting and say they have a deal. the two senators say they can bring it to a vote, and none of their members will filibuster it. house speaker john boehner says he will bring it to the house floor for a vote before new year's eve and house minority leader nancy pelosi says she can wrangle all the democratic votes it needs to pass because you would expect a lot of house republicans to vote no, so you need almost all the house democrats to vote yes. if that sounds almost too good to be true, it probably is. >> and then they sing kumbaya. never, ever going to happen. and if it does -- >> reporter: they braid each other's hair. >> you got it. we're more likely to see that. so tell us about the role in this meeting of senator mitch mcconnell. why is he a key role to this? >>
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
the day and into the evening but it appears the worst of it is definitely behind us. for "cbs this morning," i'm nalina shop row. >>> all right, meteorologist jeff giardelli in miami, what are the biggest problems right now? >> it's still snowing herself nil parts of upstate new york and vermont and new hampshire and berkshires of massachusetts. heaviest snowfall fell last night, 18 inches of snow to the south of rochester. the storm is moving east very gradually. it will be snowing the remaybe der of remainder of today in vermont, 6 to 12 inches of snow boston to new york city it's rain and there's bound to be flight delays during the day today. >> jeff what is the weekend outlook? >> well believe it or not we have another storm system building, take a look at it tomorrow morning in texas, rain will start to fall also in louisiana, that will take a similar track but further south than the last one eventually on saturday it moves into washington, d.c. philadelphia and new york city right now it's a tough call as to how much snow is going to fall but w
try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. ♪ don't know what i'd do ♪ i'd have nothing to prove ♪ i'd have nothing to lose [ male announcer ] zales is the diamond store. take an extra 10 percent off storewide, now through sunday. >>> we're counting down to slashing the 'stache. at the top of the show, we asked you, why are you awake? producer john tower has your answers. john. >> we've got bobby who writes, i'm awake in anticipation of the big slash. i'm thinking of shaving my back in solidarity with axelrod. >> ew. that's just gross. what you ought to do is wax like louis. louis, start the show. >> "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ this is it ♪ make no mistake where you are ♪ ♪ this is it >>> for 40 years, every morning when i wake up, i look in the mirror, and it's me and my mustache. and we've gone many, many mil
government in 2003. this road will contribute to the economy, enabling us to contribute to the regeneration of uk? >> can i thank my honorable friend for campaigning assiduously for this. he has made a very strong case for how this new road will open up the prospect really economic governments as well as dealing with traffic congestion. and it's exactly the program we can undertake that didn't happen under the last labour government because we made the switch. again, i congratulate him for the campaign he has fought which i think is -- [inaudible] >> given the falling number of nurses in the nhs, does he recognize that people view with skepticism what you said about protection to the nhs? will he acknowledge that passing on a 2% cut to local government will cut adult social services across the country? the foldable, the disabled, the elderly. >> just -- for so we provided billions more, but -- let me just say this point to the labour party. they want to be in government and they claim they want to cut the deficit. what would they cut? what would they cut? if they object to the local governm
in the u.s.? >> guest: well, one of the issues that i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended, and the geographical reach of slavery. i think the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century, certainly, a country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave state, and, of course, the civil war growing out of that conflict. my issue is not whether slavery's at the root of the civil war, which it certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states, and the later emancipation of slaves much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th century, and gradually, northern states and northeast and mid an lat tick states began to abolish slavely, but i learned it was a gradual process. it took a long time. what we discoveredded there were laves in new jersey in 1860, and most of the states that abolished slavery between 1780 and 1804, the period we customarily looked at, ha
. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't
will be relatively tranquil for the holidays, we're tracking one disturbance that will give us unsettled weather across portions of the gulf coast. late tonight, the houston area, we'll see thunderstorms popping up, spreading eastward throughout your christmas tuesday. louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia, interstates 10 and 20, torrential downpours, the threat for tornadoes. so a very destructive storm system on this saturday. the highest threat for tornadoes we are looking at around new orleans, mobile, right along interstate 10 and the western panhandle of florida. so definitely be on alert throughout christmas tuesday. we're looking for good snow across portions of the plain. >>> here's the rest of your christmas eve forecast. last-minute shoppers in boston and chicago could see some light snow. early showers and clearing out in l.a. >> blast of arctic air hits the upper midwest. fargo barely makes it above zero. seattle and portland in the mid 40s. >>> now we turn to the gun control debate. hundreds marched on the brooklyn bridge here in new york last night to call on congress to do som
would take the methodologies that i would use in that book and try to come up with a good explanation of the realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, a number of years ago, he called you a liberal. we have known you over the years as supposedly a conservative. give us your own views on liberal conservatives now. i was always a bit more of a populist. i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and antiestablishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or especially watergate. >> how did
there. have been several big downpours in the past few hours and mark joining us now to tell us what is happening now and what we can expect later today > >> the heaviest rain on live storm tracker 2. there is the live sweep showing you the current rainfall pattern and scatter around parts of the north bay. we will continue to show you this. just out toward san leandro. approaching san ramone, a few scattered rain showers, not to major for this part of the bay area. we will move the maps down closer to santa cruz, increasing rain closer to santa cruz and the south bay. you will seat yellows and reds flaring up. leafier rain, sunnyvale. all the areas, the yellows indicate the increase in the rainfall rates, also shifting the maps here, close in on fremont around stevenson boulevard and cherry street. especially the darker shades of green. they link up with heavier rain. with the downpours still a big part of the forecast for this morning, impact the roadways, we are out live in the field, we will have updates coming up. >> people in east palo alto continue to watch a levee that floo
has been tracking the storm for us. >> we're talking bad because it's a little bit of everything. we are looking at a severe storm certainly possible. we've already had a tornado warning posted down through northern acadia parish in louisiana. that has now since been lifted but we are going to see more severe weather break out all across the gulf coast states with a good chance of seeing some potential for tornados. we also have snow falling all across new england right now, heaviest in upstate new york. we still have the wintry mix of sleet and freezing rain back through the hartford area, and that is going to be an issue for anyone traveling early this morning. we also though have to keep an eye out for these storms where we do have a severe thunderstorm watch posted and eventually we will see severe storm warnings get issued i'd say all across louisiana. all of those flooshz of light, that's the cloud to ground lightning we're seeing. so very strong storms back through louisiana and up into northeastern texas, as well. then you go a little further north. we're talking about snow.
love to have this, i would love to have that. ♪ it's a hard knock life for us it's a hard knock like for us ♪ >> reporter: this year you can buy a walk-on role to the broadway hit "annie." or this -- a real-life jet pack. at a price of roughly $100,000, it will take you 30 feet in the hair at 30 miles an hour. this can guy do twists, turns, barrel rolls and dive bombs. when i tried it, i inched along at five feet above the water. there's a $100,000 hen house. this looks like the french poodle of hens. here the 1% of the poultry world can cluck around in a coup fitted with a living room, modeled on the palace of versailles. is something like this wasted on chickens? is there any evidence they're going to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you'll be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. >> the jet pack looks cool. the hen house, come on, now. every day. that looks like a
know about slavery in the u.s.? >> well, one of the issues i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended and the geographical reach of slavery. the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century certainly of the country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave states and the civil war growing out of the conflict. my issue is not whether slavery is at the root of the civil war, which is certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states and the leader emancipation much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th-century, and gradually northern states, northeast and mid-atlantic states abolished slavery but i realized this was a gradual process that took a long time. that what we discovered as there was leaves a new jersey in the 1860's, and most of the states that abolished slavery between c-17 80 and 1804 which is the period that we customarily lo
.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the political labels, i don't think i really have one that works terribly well at this point. to correct what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i was not working for him and he was out of the presidency. i kept up with him quite a bit. if obviously a very intelligent man, a man
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)